Archive for February, 2010

Interesting videos

Posted on February 27, 2010. Filed under: Python | Tags: , |

1. Google I/O 2008 РPainless Python by Alex Martelli (Google)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bDgD9whDfEY

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y7vwZ20SDzc

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CKEditor

Posted on February 26, 2010. Filed under: Javascript, Services | Tags: , , , |

CKEditor (formerly FCKeditor) is an open source WYSIWYG text editor from CKSource that can be used in web pages. It aims to be lightweight and requires no client-side installation.

Its core code is written in JavaScript, having server side interfaces with Active-FoxPro, ASP, ASP.NET, ColdFusion, Java, JavaScript, Lasso, Perl, PHP and Python.[3]

CKEditor is compatible with most Internet browsers, including: Internet Explorer 6.0+ (Windows), Firefox 2.0+, Safari 3.0+, Google Chrome (Windows), Opera 9.50+, and Camino 1.0+ (Apple).[3]

Reference:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CKEditor

http://ckeditor.com/

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NPAPI

Posted on February 25, 2010. Filed under: C/C++, Linux, Mac, Windows | Tags: , , |

Netscape Plugin Application Programming Interface (NPAPI) is a cross-platform plugin architecture used by many web browsers.

It was first developed for the Netscape family of browsers starting with Netscape Navigator 2.0 but has subsequently been implemented in other browsers including Mozilla Application Suite, Mozilla Firefox, Safari, Google Chrome, Opera, Konqueror, and some older versions of Microsoft Internet Explorer.

Its success can be partly attributed to its simplicity. A plugin declares that it handles certain content types (e.g. “audio/mp3”) through exposed file information. When the browser encounters such content type it loads the associated plugin, sets aside the space within the browser content for the plugin to render itself and then streams data to it. The plugin is then responsible for rendering the data as it sees fit, be it visual, audio or otherwise. So a plugin runs in-place within the page, as opposed to older browsers that had to launch an external application to handle unknown content types.

The API requires each plugin to implement and expose a comparatively small number of functions. There are approximately 15 functions in total for initializing, creating, destroying, and positioning plugins. The NPAPI also supports scripting, printing, full screen plugins, windowless plugins and content streaming.

Reference:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NPAPI

https://developer.mozilla.org/en/Plugins

http://colonelpanic.net/2009/03/building-a-firefox-plugin-part-one/

http://colonelpanic.net/2009/05/building-a-firefox-plugin-part-two/

http://colonelpanic.net/2009/08/building-a-firefox-plugin-%E2%80%93-part-three/

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